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amandapalmer:

permabear:

It’s been a funny old week, Granville. Lily Allen, a popstar I have loved and championed and interviewed and happily chatted to on Twitter, released a video for a new song called Hard Out Here. In the video she sings that she doesn’t need to shake her arse because she’s got a brain, while a group…

wise words.

I’m Asian, had my fair share of being subject to racism, and I didn’t think that video was racist.  I didn’t even consider the race of the dancers who were in that video until all the uproar began.

I saw Lily Allen, yes a bit more clothed than the usual pop star, though I thought that was part of the point that was being made, dancing around with some suit telling her how she should be acting in order to be defined as sexy, while attractive dancers danced provocatively and attired in a manner which is now considered the norm in mainstream media, and taking advantage of the new dance craze that has been exploited so much in recent months, ironically juxtaposed with lyrics that deliberately make fun of, and highlight, the superficial nature of the industry.

I derived as much entertainment at the tongue-in-cheek references in Hard Out Here as I did in the similar references in Defined Lines, the Blurred Lines parody.

I’m not quite sure what all the fuss is about.  Would people have felt differently if the dancers were white? Or would we also be seeing headlines about how racist it is that white dancers are appropriating black creative property again? Which I thought was bizarre as well.

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jessicatron:

To the man I overheard on the bus in conversation tell a woman, presumably a friend; “You are too ugly to be raped.”,

Dear man on the bus, 
As these words fall out of your mouth
I pray that no one ever finds your children beautiful enough to break open, and make a silent depurative symbol out of them. 

This is powerful and sad. :(

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flyingfreakflag:

"develop a backbone not a wishbone". scene. 

Yet another thing that makes me feel like one of those crotchety old biddies who used to do things like report to our school when they saw our students not wearing blazers off campus.
But this.  All of it.

flyingfreakflag:

"develop a backbone not a wishbone". scene. 

Yet another thing that makes me feel like one of those crotchety old biddies who used to do things like report to our school when they saw our students not wearing blazers off campus.

But this.  All of it.

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theresalighton:

Seeing this image probably would’ve put an end to me wanting to be a Ninja* Turtle when I was a kid**.
*They were Hero Turtles in the UK, because Ninjas were considered too scary for us.
**I planned to be the only female turtle, with a yellow mask. My weapon was my fiendish intelligence, and Michelangelo would share his pizza slices with me, but would pick off the pepperoni first (because I didn’t know what pepperoni was and it looked weird). C’mon, I was only nine!

As I grew up in Australia, they were always TMNT. But my dad picked up little books in Malaysia were labelled with the Hero variant as well.
In primary school, my classmates RP’d/LARP’d TMNT in our school uniforms, and I was Raphael. Because none of the others wanted him, and I had to pick last.
Yes, I was that kid.

theresalighton:

Seeing this image probably would’ve put an end to me wanting to be a Ninja* Turtle when I was a kid**.

*They were Hero Turtles in the UK, because Ninjas were considered too scary for us.

**I planned to be the only female turtle, with a yellow mask. My weapon was my fiendish intelligence, and Michelangelo would share his pizza slices with me, but would pick off the pepperoni first (because I didn’t know what pepperoni was and it looked weird). C’mon, I was only nine!

As I grew up in Australia, they were always TMNT. But my dad picked up little books in Malaysia were labelled with the Hero variant as well.

In primary school, my classmates RP’d/LARP’d TMNT in our school uniforms, and I was Raphael. Because none of the others wanted him, and I had to pick last.

Yes, I was that kid.

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For reference, you don’t put sharks fin in porridge.  Porridge is peasant/home food at less than $1 a bowl, and sharks fin traditionally goes into soup which is considerably more than $1 a bowl.  Shark porridge is also no different to buying shark at fish and chip shops in Australia.
The sharks whose fins are the subject of such a lot of controversy don’t actually have edible/sale-able meat (that I have been informed), which is part of what makes their slaughter for just the fins such a shame.  With my upbringing and culture, we don’t like waste, so I’d feel better about the whole thing if we could eat the rest of the shark as well, or at least put the rest of the shark to good use.
Also, I have no regrets or shame about eating and enjoying the food that I do regardless of the social stigmas attached to it.  I don’t go out of my way to find these items because they’re usually costly, and harder to acquire due to the issues surrounding rarity and sometimes questionable ways that they are sourced.  But I don’t turn away food if it’s given to me, because it would be just as much of an atrocity to waste it.
On a side note, much of the western world[1] comes down hard on other cultures who eat foods they’re not accustomed to, and I can’t speak for all cultures or people, but I know that I don’t waste. Nose-to-tail is where it’s at.  I know and hear of a lot of people who don’t eat those parts or other unconventional meats because it’s ‘gross’ or ‘not normal’, but these same people will happily criticise others for what they choose to ingest.
And places like the UK have a stigma against veal because they feel it’s inhumane to consume baby bull meat, but have no problem with them being destroyed which is what happens to many of them anyway.  Isn’t it as much of a travesty to waste the life of an animal when so many people are living in hunger around the world?
Moral of this post: Don’t waste good food.

[1] I know not all of the western world.  Some people have always had a nose-to-tail attitude, and more are becoming adventurous, possibly due to popularisation through cooking and lifestyle shows and travel.

For reference, you don’t put sharks fin in porridge.  Porridge is peasant/home food at less than $1 a bowl, and sharks fin traditionally goes into soup which is considerably more than $1 a bowl.  Shark porridge is also no different to buying shark at fish and chip shops in Australia.

The sharks whose fins are the subject of such a lot of controversy don’t actually have edible/sale-able meat (that I have been informed), which is part of what makes their slaughter for just the fins such a shame.  With my upbringing and culture, we don’t like waste, so I’d feel better about the whole thing if we could eat the rest of the shark as well, or at least put the rest of the shark to good use.

Also, I have no regrets or shame about eating and enjoying the food that I do regardless of the social stigmas attached to it.  I don’t go out of my way to find these items because they’re usually costly, and harder to acquire due to the issues surrounding rarity and sometimes questionable ways that they are sourced.  But I don’t turn away food if it’s given to me, because it would be just as much of an atrocity to waste it.

On a side note, much of the western world[1] comes down hard on other cultures who eat foods they’re not accustomed to, and I can’t speak for all cultures or people, but I know that I don’t waste. Nose-to-tail is where it’s at.  I know and hear of a lot of people who don’t eat those parts or other unconventional meats because it’s ‘gross’ or ‘not normal’, but these same people will happily criticise others for what they choose to ingest.

And places like the UK have a stigma against veal because they feel it’s inhumane to consume baby bull meat, but have no problem with them being destroyed which is what happens to many of them anyway.  Isn’t it as much of a travesty to waste the life of an animal when so many people are living in hunger around the world?

Moral of this post: Don’t waste good food.


[1] I know not all of the western world.  Some people have always had a nose-to-tail attitude, and more are becoming adventurous, possibly due to popularisation through cooking and lifestyle shows and travel.

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To the guy who insisted on walking me to the subway station last night:

sweetupndown9:

instamatical:

Thank you. 

I try not to walk through my neighborhood alone after dark. Last night, I was going to a birthday party, and I didn’t have a choice. What I was wearing shouldn’t have been relevant, but let’s be real: my knee-high boots and peacoat that was just a little longer than my dress elicited even more catcalls than usual. 

When you approached me, I immediately started pawing through my purse for my keys. I don’t know if I planned to stab you, or what, but I’m sorry I completely ignored you and sped up as you got closer, because “Those guys are dicks, and I just want to make sure you get where you’re going without them bothering you” was the last thing I expected  to hear. I am 5’7” with an average build, and you were at least 6’4” and built like a linebacker, so please understand my apprehension. 

What I really appreciated, though, was the fact that you kept your distance, You could tell that I was still a little uncomfortable and you respected that. You stayed a few feet behind me for the few blocks I had to walk, and when someone whistled at me from their stoop, you yelled “leave the lady alone!” As soon as I got to the subway station, I turned back to wave at you. You smiled, waved back, and said that you hoped that I had fun wherever I was going. 

Thank you for your concern, whoever you are. I appreciate it. I really, really do. 

Dear guy.

Thanks for being a decent human being and looking after someone. 

Signed, 

Random Internet user.

Sharing because he was caring.

(via suitep)

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"

The following day, I attended a workshop about preventing gender violence, facilitated by Katz. There, he posed a question to all of the men in the room: “Men, what things do you do to protect yourself from being raped or sexually assaulted?”

Not one man, including myself, could quickly answer the question. Finally, one man raised his hand and said, “Nothing.” Then Katz asked the women, “What things do you do to protect yourself from being raped or sexually assaulted?” Nearly all of the women in the room raised their hand. One by one, each woman testified:

“I don’t make eye contact with men when I walk down the street,” said one.
“I don’t put my drink down at parties,” said another.
“I use the buddy system when I go to parties.”
“I cross the street when I see a group of guys walking in my direction.”
“I use my keys as a potential weapon.”

The women went on for several minutes, until their side of the blackboard was completely filled with responses. The men’s side of the blackboard was blank. I was stunned. I had never heard a group of women say these things before. I thought about all of the women in my life — including my mother, sister and girlfriend — and realized that I had a lot to learn about gender.

"

Why I Am A Male Feminist (via newwavefeminism)

(via beetleginny)

Insightful.

(via neil-gaiman)

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Quite right.
And we might even discover that FTL travel really can happen.

Quite right.

And we might even discover that FTL travel really can happen.

(Source: thepocketuniverse.com, via brain-food)

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theresalighton:

david-noel:

Bravo, Apple. Thanks for making this. It Gets Better.

texturismbijanjoshuanguyen

Applause.

Important and lovely. This made me cry a little bit.

This was a brilliant video.

And YouTube took it down due to its “policy on depiction of harmful activities”.

*golf clap*

Edit: YouTube put it back. Well done.

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brain-food:

Inner City 4th Graders Share their Stories

Two years ago, Judy Gelles was volunteering at an inner city public school and was assigned to a fourth-grade class. The school was as diverse as they come with children from African American, Hispanic and Asian immigrants. After several months of helping the students with their reading skills, she felt the need to connect with them on a deeper level. Mostly, she wanted to find out their stories.She asked each student the following three questions:Whom do they live with?What do they wish for?What do they worry about?The project turned out to be an eye-opening experience. “Their stories seemed to capture the gamut of societal issues that we face today; violence, immigration, the demise of the nuclear family, global hunger, and the impact of the media and popular culture,” she tells us. “The gray fortress door of the school became a blank slate for their words. Since the student is not be facing the camera, he or she remains anonymous. The words and images become more universal, rather than specific to that particular student.”
Judy Gelles website and book


People keep saying that kids have it easy, that things were simpler when they were young. It might have been like that once, but probably not so much any more.

brain-food:

Inner City 4th Graders Share their Stories

Two years ago, Judy Gelles was volunteering at an inner city public school and was assigned to a fourth-grade class. The school was as diverse as they come with children from African American, Hispanic and Asian immigrants. After several months of helping the students with their reading skills, she felt the need to connect with them on a deeper level. Mostly, she wanted to find out their stories.

She asked each student the following three questions:
Whom do they live with?
What do they wish for?
What do they worry about?

The project turned out to be an eye-opening experience. “Their stories seemed to capture the gamut of societal issues that we face today; violence, immigration, the demise of the nuclear family, global hunger, and the impact of the media and popular culture,” she tells us. “The gray fortress door of the school became a blank slate for their words. Since the student is not be facing the camera, he or she remains anonymous. The words and images become more universal, rather than specific to that particular student.”

Judy Gelles website and book

People keep saying that kids have it easy, that things were simpler when they were young. It might have been like that once, but probably not so much any more.

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