Photoset

rhodeskc:

There’s generally two groups in cycling commuting.  The first is Fabian Cancellara level effort.  You need a shower after this and using the same clothes is out of the question.  Premium merino for this crowd has the advantages of being able to be dried in confined spaces without making it smell like a high school gym.

The second actually applies to the majority of commuters.  Casual pace.  Slow. Barely working up a sweat at all. Maybe getting a tiny bit of perspiration on your brow when you stop at a light simply because you stopped moving. The “take my time” commuter cyclist. That type of individual is what this is designed for, where they would arrive, have no need for a shower but would otherwise need 2 sets of clothes.  It attempts to simplify the process by allowing them to simply walk in.

I fall in to the first group. The distances I ride are too far to do casual pace. However if I lived much closer like most people in my area do (under 3 mi / 5 km, or 20 minutes at a casual pace including stop lights), then this would be a very realistic solution.

Fair point. I suppose most of the commuter cyclists I see around here, and know, here are definitely going to be cycling a distance farther than would be sensibly manageable at a casual pace.

But definitely if you’re within a casual 20 minute ride, and don’t perspire at the drop of a hat, it would be a good option. It’s not as though I didn’t cycle to school in my uniform when I was 10-15 minutes ride away.

(Source: brain-food)

Loading...

Photoset

brain-food:

commuter suit for bike riders

San Francisco-based designer Parker Dusseau created the Commuter Suit. Built to wick away moisture while giving the rider a great range of motion and comfort while pedaling, this suit gets you to work looking damn sharp.

Premium Australian merino wool is the key to breathability in the suit’s jacket and pants, with a smidgen of spandex woven into the mix to give you flexibility. The Commuter Suit regulates body temperature and keeps you dry from the pesky elements.

As stylish as this is, I hope this is just meant to be considered a riding outfit, and not a ride-and-work outfit.

I think you’d be doing your co-workers a disservice if you sweat in this outfit on your ride in, and then chose to work beside them in the same clothes. Even if you took a shower and put them back on.

Premium merino is meant to be highly breathable and odour resistant.  But there’s only so far you can take that if you want to be a conscientious and courteous co-worker.

Loading...

Photoset

brain-food:

Bulletproof 3-piece Suits by Garrison Bespoke 

I can’t make this shit up. 

Extremely functional fashion. I wonder if the bulletproof-ness adds a notable amount of weight to the clothing.  However, that is probably not much of a factor for consideration if you’re thinking of getting these made.

Loading...

Photo
(via 10 Outstanding Oxblood Pieces for Fall | Style Me Pretty)
Marcus, you may want to review this post for items which may complement your new bag. If this does not suit your personal style, I recommend finding a gf to put them on.

(via 10 Outstanding Oxblood Pieces for Fall | Style Me Pretty)

Marcus, you may want to review this post for items which may complement your new bag. If this does not suit your personal style, I recommend finding a gf to put them on.

Loading...

Quote
"Thanks. It has pockets!"

- every girl ever responding to a compliment on a skirt/dress that has pockets (via nbronten)

This made me laugh - I do this! And I’m not even a “girl”.

(via theresalighton)


This is so true. And never was this so important as when I discovered the pockets on my bridesmaid’s dress for Sylvia and Jono’s wedding.  Those pockets contained my iPhone, with which I took ninja shots and a large quantity of tissues for teary bride and bride’s family.  Note to all future brides, bonus points if you choose bridesmaids’ dresses with pockets.

Sadly, my bridesmaids had no pockets.

(Source: captainmarvel, via theresalighton)

Loading...

Photoset

(via brain-food):

하민 & 케빈 왕 …I ▼ HVRMINN AND KEVIN WANG

(Source: telisu-gallery)

Loading...

Photoset

thevintagethimble:

1920’s Hairstyles
A collection of 1920’s photographs, depicting some of the hairstyles of the time, like the kiss curl, the orchid bob, the charleston cut, coconut bob, earphones hairstyle, cottage loaf (bun) and popular styles you’ll probably never see in a period drama like extreme windblown style, the frizzy hairstyle and the Poodle cut.

Victorian Hairstyles Here [x] | Edwardian Hairstyles Here [x] | 1930’s Hairstyles Here [x] | WW2 Hairstyles Here [x]

(via tofu)

Loading...

Text

Vest, Tank Top, Sweater Vest, Waistcoat

theresalighton:

english2english:

Vest, Tank Top, Sweater Vest, Waistcoat

A vest in the UK is a tank top in the US. A tank top in the UK is a sweater vest in the US. A vest in the US is a waistcoat in the UK. 

(Advantage: We’re confused.)

I’m loving this blog, particularly for this entry.

So…

I call the things with the spaghetti straps (or even slightly wider straps provided they are not so wide as to be also be considered a “sleeveless top”) a “tank top”.  Or a “camisole” if it is too thin, sheer or intimate looking to be possibly considered reasonable outerwear[1].

For men, the things which are not sleeveless tops with slightly thinner straps that are not as thin as spaghetti straps, which men are known to wear underneath button-down shirts, I call “singlets”.  But I understand that when worn as outerwear, are also called “wife-beaters”. What I call singlets are definitely not what Google images says they are…

Those knits which are almost like sleeveless tops that have no buttons and worn by pulling over the head, I call “vests”. But I know they are also called “sweater vests”.  I have a couple which are cut such that I can wear them on their own like a knit “sleeveless top”, or a vest over the top of a button-down shirt.

The things which are sort of shaped like vests but are not usually made of knit (or if so, fine knits) and have buttons, I call, interchangeably, “vests” and “waist-coats”. Although those which are more formal or worn as part of a three-piece suit, I will be more inclined to call a “waist-coat”.  Whereas less formal ones that are usually worn open, belted or made of denim (if you were of the 90210 / 90s era) I would call “vests”.


[1] Personally, I rarely wear them as outerwear anyway, because I am conscious of the fact that I lack a sixpack, fourpack or whatever level of abdominal tonedness that is not described as a muffin-top.

Loading...

Photo
theresalighton:

An illustration from a 1900 issue of Ladies Home Journal showing the change from Victorian to Edwardian silhouettes.
Push those bottoms out, ladies!

That’s neat. I was horribly confused for a bit because I thought bustles were more Victorian than Edwardian, but a quick google and re-read of that illustration made me realise it’s all about the corset. :P

theresalighton:

An illustration from a 1900 issue of Ladies Home Journal showing the change from Victorian to Edwardian silhouettes.

Push those bottoms out, ladies!

That’s neat. I was horribly confused for a bit because I thought bustles were more Victorian than Edwardian, but a quick google and re-read of that illustration made me realise it’s all about the corset. :P

Loading...

Photo
brain-food:

Staying true to his signature style British- Turkish Cypriot fashion designer, Hussein Chalayan, debuted his line of transforming dresses for Fall Winter 2013-14 at Paris Fashion Week. 

I’m imagining that the fabric used for the black dress feels amazing.

brain-food:

Staying true to his signature style British- Turkish Cypriot fashion designer, Hussein Chalayan, debuted his line of transforming dresses for Fall Winter 2013-14 at Paris Fashion Week. 

I’m imagining that the fabric used for the black dress feels amazing.

Loading...

Stuff I like